Find Web Developers
Find Web Developers

Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Learn 4 Ways to Impress Your Boss and Team With Your Web Development Skills

Thursday, September 6th, 2018

Firstly let me just say that contrary to the title I would always advocate not actually ‘trying’ to impress anyone. You should only ever do things for the right reason. However that said in my experience if you put the hard work in stick to your principles and work with everyone as you expect them to work with you, 90% of the time you will invariably impress people. Here’s my top 4 tips to set yourself apart from the crowd.

1) Don’t ‘moan’ about the code base

We have all been there, you are put on a project with ‘old messy’ a business critical application that is terrible in form but a mainstay nonetheless, seems like it just needs to be re-written? In my experience just haphazardly whinging about it doesn’t go anywhere, instead become an expert with it this will immediately make it more bearable, spend time with it, get to know it, write tools to help you inspect it. Bring it up at the right time sometimes (team meetings) but be judicious about complaining about it. You will become the go to point for that code and will be seen to be a ‘useful’ resource rather than a hindrance.

2) Express curiosity before shouting about your mastery

The most common downfall I see with developers is their desire to prove to people how much they know. Whilst the more each member on a team knows the better, this virtue can be rapidly unravelled by a developer who wants to blow their trumpet about how expert they are about a particular subject. In short this behaviour just seeks to irritate people. Instead find an inner peace and learn everything you can. Avoid advertising what you know or trying to prove it. If you do really know your onions let people discover this for themselves it will be more fun and people will respect you for it more.

3) Learn to prioritise and focus your web development tasks

Can’t stress this point enough. Find out what you have to do and put it in one single list that you can work in ORDER. If people come to you with things they want done then remember you ultimately need to be able to make decisions on the order that you work on something in a given timeframe. If you’re not allowed to then make sure you stand your ground you may need to politely explain if someone is trying to hijack your ‘flow’ as they could be micromanaging you. After you have set your priorities make sure you work on one task until completion, if you need switch your email off and set your mobile phone to ‘answerphone’. If people disturb you just let them know you will get back to them ASAP about it. If someone of authority does force you to stop what you are doing to work on something as a priority then politely explain that you are working on something but that you will do this seeing as they have expressed how important it is. Prioritising and focussing will ultimately lead to a greater amount of work achieved and you will be respected for the speed at which you work.

4) Get good on Saturday mornings and learn more programming skills

Sometimes learning during your working day can be difficult because you have to ‘deliver’ right? Fine, so think of Saturday mornings like this. A time when you no-one can tell you how or what to work on. I recommend looking into one subject that has been niggling you most recently and studying it in depth. Take a clean project in visual studio, get the MSDN site open on the relevant page and start coding something and investigating how it works. I call this ‘career investment’. The results won’t be immediate but over time as you do this every weekend you will become very proficient in areas that other people aren’t. The law of averages dictate that what you have learned will be useful on your project and people will respect you for your deep knowledge when this becomes apparent!

Web Development and Full Integration

Thursday, September 6th, 2018

‘Fully integrated’ is a term used to describes websites that are progressive enough to include virtually every form of online media in their web presence.

If you look at sites like Yahoo, Forbes and virtually any of the major television network sites you can gain some idea of what I am taking about.

These sites contain either news of blog information. They also contain original video streaming sources and audio streams including podcasts. These sites tend to subscribe to the idea that the web user wants it all and should be able to find it all when they visit the business site.

A fully integrated site will often use flash or other animated or moving text. The interesting dynamic is that the best of these sites understand navigation and ease of use remains a critical concern for guests.

Forbes, for example is highly adept at slideshow type presentations on a multitude of topics. It could be top selling cars, entertainers, vacation hot spots, etc. These slideshows are optimized for search engines and are easy to breeze through.

It seems as if a site like this has the potential to garner some of the same consumers of media that have been courted mostly by network television or traditional newsprint.

Most fully integrated sites did not start off that way. In most cases they worked through issues they could easily address and then added features as their knowledge and confidence grew in relation to the their site development skills.

That’s something I have always suggested. Do the best you can at developing a site with the most comprehensive development techniques at your disposal. That doesn’t mean you have to have a fully integrated site in order to conduct business, but it does mean that you do not simply wipe your brow, release a sigh and suggest to yourself that your work is finished.

The truth is there are more skills in online web development that are being released than ever before. More programs are working with each other allowing a new robust platform for online use. The role of online web development is an ever changing – ever growing function in relation to how you manage your site and in the use of the most effective marketing tools available.

Many sites will develop an internal compass that provides the date they want to upgrade the website to include new functions. In essence they treat their website like software developers treat upgrades. Some will even go so far as to indicate their website has gone from version 1.0 to version 1.1 or 1.5. The idea is to challenge their own thinking in relation to developing a website even after the website has been launched.

This has the potential of keeping visitors interested in finding out what improvements you will come up with next.

Perhaps the greatest development rule of thumb is that you should always strive to be more integrated by attempting to meet the real and perceived expectations of your site visitors. This mentality will always give you a new goal line in your race for the perfect business.

Looking For a Web Developer – Look Online Or Look Locally?

Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

Often the first decision a business makes about graphic and website design projects, is where to have the work done. Is it a good idea to find a local provider, or is it better to look for someone online?

The advantage of finding someone online is that if you look long enough, you are almost certain to find a price that is much less than you can find locally. This is principally true for website and graphic design work, as the worldwide pool of providers is very. A business in India, for example, will always have lower costs than a business in Hawaii. The costs of sourcing projects online to providers in distant locations may seem clear: you can always find a better price.

The risk, however, is that the overall project costs will be much higher in the end. Consider:

1. Do you really trust the online/remote business? If they are located in distant country, for example, what assurance do you have that they will complete your project. Will they protect your company’s confidential data? These businesses do not operate under U.S. laws, and as such, you will have no legal jurisdiction to file a claim.

2. What level of communication will you have? Can you call and speak to someone in English? What about time zones? Does the designer understand English well or will you always have to work through a project manager? Do you have to communicate only by email? Do you want to describe everything in written English?

3. What are the total costs? Some businesses give a very low price for a website and then charge very high rates for modifications and hosting?

4. Does the person doing your work have adequate skills to complete the project? A nice, shiny website might be a template the designer bought and installed. In other words, the person you are hiring might have a very low skill level and will not be able to complete a project to your specifications.

5. Does your low-cost provider rely on clip art and templates and? If you’re OK with a website with no original graphics or design, a template may be a cheap way to get something online.

6. What happens after the project is finished? Will the designer make revisions for you at an affordable cost? Will they provide any after-service support?

The decision to hire a web developer is one that should not be based solely on price. A web design project will take tens of hours of time for the developer and the buyer, so it’s important to make sure you have a web designer that is a good fit.